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Vertigo

MAGIC LINING
The project focuses on the possibilities for altering people’s self-perception through the garment’s inside. Fashion is famous for its ability to alter people’s self perception through the looks: supportive garments adjusting the body physically (corset, tights, heels), form elements creating illusions (shoulderpads, 18th century costumes), uniforms or sub-culture looks creating the sense of belonging or exclusion. The current project looks into possible ways of altering self-perception from inside of the garment. Is there a way to change one’s self-perception without relying on the feedback and the need for approval from other people?
Magic Lining builds on the insights from MAGICSHOES project and proposes a garment that allows the wearer’s the feel as if their body would be made of a different material. What happens in the transition moment, when the wearer shifts from his/her own body to the marble on, or the other way around? In the intersection of neuroscience research on mental body-representation (MBR), human-computer interaction (HCI) and real-life smart textile applications, the project ask questions about the meaning of clothing.

Residency localizations:
Main localization: Universidad Loyola Andalucia, Calle Energía Solar, 1, 41014 Sevilla, Spain
DEI Interactive Systems Group, Departamento de Informática, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
HCI group, School of Digital Technologies, Tallinn University

Spellbound

Spellbound

Spellbound is an Estonian-based brand for conscious magic-lovers. The products are designed to shape the future fashion consumption towards sustainability. The items are developed and produced in Estonia. Spellbound explores new sustainable directions in textile and garment design. Simple textile items get interesting twists by the implementation of technology and innovative concepts. Spellbound stands for global knowledge and ideas while using high-quality locally sourced left-over materials and ethical principals for production.

We support sustainability in garment design by using left-over natural materials as the starting point for our product design. We introduce and promote the made-to-order business model in garment design to minimize the over-production and pre-consumer waste. Spellbound’s items are produced (from fabric to finalized garment) locally in Estonia (Europe) following ethics and high-quality standards. We value these sustainability grounds above seasonal fashion colors and fast-changing styles.

We love hidden stories and magic about and in the Spellbound garments. We communicate the textile story from the fabric to the final piece to raise the public awareness. We create surprising dynamic stories on the garments through color-changing materials. The owls start to fly in the night, the animals’ eyes shine in the night forest etc.

Spellbound stretches the borders of what garments can do to give them back their traditionally higher value. Join us to support sustainability, ethical production, magic and innovative routes in garments life cycle.

In Spellbound’s first series of products for Autumn/Winter, Glow-in-the-dark stories come to life on sustainable garments made from left-over fabrics from Estonian companies. The items are produced in Estonia and illustrated by artists based in Estonia and the Netherlands.

We hope you enjoy the journey towards a more sustainable garment design with us!

www.spellbound.ee

textales Privacy Policy

This privacy policy has been compiled to better serve those who are concerned with how their ‘Personally Identifiable Information’ (PII) is being used online. PII, as described in US privacy law and information security, is information that can be used on its own or with other information to identify, contact, or locate a single person, or to identify an individual in context. Please read our privacy policy carefully to get a clear understanding of how we collect, use, protect or otherwise handle your Personally Identifiable Information in accordance with our website.

What personal information do we collect from the people that visit our blog, website or app?

When ordering or registering on our site, as appropriate, you may be asked to enter your camera or other details to help you with your experience.

When do we collect information?

We collect information from you when you or enter information on our site.
How do we use your information?

We may use the information we collect from you when you register, make a purchase, sign up for our newsletter, respond to a survey or marketing communication, surf the website, or use certain other site features in the following ways:
How do we protect your information?

We do not use vulnerability scanning and/or scanning to PCI standards.
We only provide articles and information. We never ask for credit card numbers.
We do not use Malware Scanning.

We do not use an SSL certificate
• We only provide articles and information. We never ask for personal or private information like names, email addresses, or credit card numbers.

Do we use ‘cookies’?

We do not use cookies for tracking purposes

You can choose to have your computer warn you each time a cookie is being sent, or you can choose to turn off all cookies. You do this through your browser settings. Since browser is a little different, look at your browser’s Help Menu to learn the correct way to modify your cookies.

If you turn cookies off, some features will be disabled. that make your site experience more efficient and may not function properly.

However, you will still be able to place orders .
Third-party disclosure

We do not sell, trade, or otherwise transfer to outside parties your Personally Identifiable Information.

Third-party links

We do not include or offer third-party products or services on our website.

Google

Google’s advertising requirements can be summed up by Google’s Advertising Principles. They are put in place to provide a positive experience for users. https://support.google.com/adwordspolicy/answer/1316548?hl=en

We have not enabled Google AdSense on our site but we may do so in the future.

California Online Privacy Protection Act

CalOPPA is the first state law in the nation to require commercial websites and online services to post a privacy policy. The law’s reach stretches well beyond California to require any person or company in the United States (and conceivably the world) that operates websites collecting Personally Identifiable Information from California consumers to post a conspicuous privacy policy on its website stating exactly the information being collected and those individuals or companies with whom it is being shared. – See more at: http://consumercal.org/california-online-privacy-protection-act-caloppa/#sthash.0FdRbT51.dpuf

According to CalOPPA, we agree to the following:
Users can visit our site anonymously.
Once this privacy policy is created, we will add a link to it on our home page or as a minimum, on the first significant page after entering our website.
Our Privacy Policy link includes the word ‘Privacy’ and can easily be found on the page specified above.

You will be notified of any Privacy Policy changes:
• On our Privacy Policy Page
Can change your personal information:
• By emailing us

How does our site handle Do Not Track signals?
We honor Do Not Track signals and Do Not Track, plant cookies, or use advertising when a Do Not Track (DNT) browser mechanism is in place.

Does our site allow third-party behavioral tracking?
It’s also important to note that we do not allow third-party behavioral tracking

COPPA (Children Online Privacy Protection Act)

When it comes to the collection of personal information from children under the age of 13 years old, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) puts parents in control. The Federal Trade Commission, United States’ consumer protection agency, enforces the COPPA Rule, which spells out what operators of websites and online services must do to protect children’s privacy and safety online.

We do not specifically market to children under the age of 13 years old.

Fair Information Practices

The Fair Information Practices Principles form the backbone of privacy law in the United States and the concepts they include have played a significant role in the development of data protection laws around the globe. Understanding the Fair Information Practice Principles and how they should be implemented is critical to comply with the various privacy laws that protect personal information.

In order to be in line with Fair Information Practices we will take the following responsive action, should a data breach occur:
We will notify the users via in-site notification
• Within 7 business days

We also agree to the Individual Redress Principle which requires that individuals have the right to legally pursue enforceable rights against data collectors and processors who fail to adhere to the law. This principle requires not only that individuals have enforceable rights against data users, but also that individuals have recourse to courts or government agencies to investigate and/or prosecute non-compliance by data processors.

CAN SPAM Act

The CAN-SPAM Act is a law that sets the rules for commercial email, establishes requirements for commercial messages, gives recipients the right to have emails stopped from being sent to them, and spells out tough penalties for violations.

We collect your email address in order to:
• Send information, respond to inquiries, and/or other requests or questions

To be in accordance with CANSPAM, we agree to the following:
• Not use false or misleading subjects or email addresses.
• Identify the message as an advertisement in some reasonable way.
• Include the physical address of our business or site headquarters.
• Monitor third-party email marketing services for compliance, if one is used.
• Honor opt-out/unsubscribe requests quickly.
• Allow users to unsubscribe by using the link at the bottom of each email.

If at any time you would like to unsubscribe from receiving future emails, you can email us at
• Follow the instructions at the bottom of each email.
and we will promptly remove you from ALL correspondence.
Contacting Us

If there are any questions regarding this privacy policy, you may contact us using the information below.

textales.eu

Last Edited on 2017-02-22

Textales Little Red Riding Hood

Textales Little Red Riding Hood edition is developed in collaboration with Unit040, Welspun and Kerstin Zabransky. Welspun India Ltd. is a fully integrated home textile manufacturer. It is one of the largest global home textile producers, with world class manufacturing facilities in India.

With Textales Little Red Riding Hood edition, we take the project another step closer to commercialisation. The version is developed for showcasing the possibilities of Augmented Reality storytelling on textiles to potential clients. In The Little Red Riding Hood edition of Textales, parents and children share the experience of the fairy tale of Little Red Riding Hood through Augmented Reality. The Textales application running on a smartphone or a tablet device detects the patterns on the duvet, pillow and carpet and shows digital fairytale characters. Digital dynamics are combined with textile sustainability. The project team intends to improve the details of the duvet cover as well as the digital application. The images are printed to a softer textile in this iteration, and allow therefore more colours and smaller details to be designed.

The Little Red Riding Hood story can be played with or without the subtitles suggesting theplot, as in the previous version. If the parent chooses to see the subtitles, a whole fairy tale is written throughout different scenes of the story. If the parent chooses not to see the subtitles, he can imagine his adventures for the Little Red Riding Hood and the wolf. The application has a constant forest sound in the background with occasional overriding scene-specific sound effects, such as water dropping when Little Red Riding Hood is feeding the swans, or the wolf roaring when it finds the empty house of the grandmother. The fine and detailed graphics and animations add an extra magic layer to the textile.

In the very colourful story canvas, Little Red Riding Hood goes wandering into the forests on the digitally printed duvet cover, pillow and a rug (Figure 22). The wolf has his parallel adventures. The story reveals an alternative plot and ending to the traditional fairy tale. Through that, contemporary values and ways of communicating are put into a classic fairy tale.

Textales Demo edition

Demo Textile is developed in collaboration with Unit040, Johan van den Acker Textielfabriek and Studio Toer.

Bedtime Stories Demo Textile was developed to open up the concept of Bedtime Stories to wider application areas. While fairy tales and kids led to a very interesting direction, the project team aimed to allow people to think along and to imagine the combination of Augmented Reality on textiles in their context for their use, and not to be limited by the initial fairy tale setting. It is common to use swatches as smaller textile samples in textile industry to give an idea of the proposed product line to the prospective clients. Similarly, software companies offer demo versions of their applications to communicate and to give an understanding of the experience their specific software offers. To be able to communicate to both fields, the project team decided to create a small piece of textile with an application communicating the essence of the project in a context-neutral way. Therefore, the chosen theme was a textile field with digitally growing flowers.

Demo Textile cloth can be used on a surface, but also on a body or wrapped around different objects, etc. Demo Textile is an open-use cloth, therefore, different ideas and concepts can be explored with it. When scanned with the software application on a tablet or smartphone device, the digital flowers appear on top of the red canvas. The flowers can be manipulated by touching the textile. When developing the Demo Textile, the team put considerable effort into fine-tuning the textile pattern to achieve a result where the designers were happy with the aesthetics and the image recognition Augmented Reality application would result in a stable 3D projection of flowers on the textile surface. Getting to know the basics of image recognition software over several design iterations helped the graphic designer to propose a very stable end design – when the cloth was moved, the flowers moved along much more smoothly and more reliably than in previous versions.

Demo Textile is a woven cloth with digital flowers growing from it. The red surface resembles the Brabants bont – the textile pattern originating from Brabant area, where Eindhoven, the hometown of the project, is situated. The flowers represent cultures of the project partners involved at the moment of developing the concept. Three tulips stand for the Dutch and one cornflower for the Estonian involved in the project.

The application is available for Android devices in Google Play as Textales Demo edition.

For further details and the full research rationale behind the work, please see Kristi’s PhD thesis.

Textales DreamBear edition

Crafting sustainable smart textile services

Kristi Kuusk’s PhD thesis titled “Crafting sustainable smart textile services”
Crafting sustainable smart textile services
Crafting sustainable smart textile services, Kristi Kuusk. Cover: Kerstin Zabransky

The world is looking for solutions to major sustainability challenges that developed with the consumer culture. Among other fields and aspects, the way people design, produce, wear and dispose clothes in the traditional cradle-to-grave model has gained interest. The garment life cycle is continuously innovated from different angles. Examples of sustainable materials, business models and ways of thinking about clothing appear in research and practice both. Independently, the fashion scene gets more and more curious about the possibilities of using electronics and digital properties in clothing, also known as fashion technology, wearable technology and smart textiles. The marriage of the two worlds, that closely influences many people, carries potential concerns and opportunities. Textile manufacturing was one of the drivers of the development of technology from pre-industrial craftsmanship to today’s industrialized consumer culture. In this work, crafts and craftsmanship are taken as an example of sustainable living. The traditional crafts and sustainability are discussed in the context of the developing field of smart textile services. This doctoral dissertation examines the following central research question: what are craft and sustainability qualities and how are they implicitly used in the design of smart textile services?

 

The public PhD defence ceremony took place on 18. Feb 2016:
Chairman: prof.dr.ir. A.C. Brombacher
1st promotor: prof.dr. R. Wakkary
copromotor(s): dr.ir. S.A.G. Wensveen, dr. O. Tomico Plasencia
Comittee: prof.dr. L.-L. Chen, prof.dr. N. Nimkulrat (Estonian Academy of Arts), ir. K. van Os (Philips Research), dr. K. Niinimäki (Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture)

 

The dissertation brings together the smart textile examples with three different levels of integration of textiles and technology:

  1. Separated – Digital Stories on Textile exemplified by: QR coded Embroidery, Bedtime Stories, Textales Dream Bear, and Textales Sunny Sunday editions.
  2. Integrated – Body Sensing and Actuating Networks exemplified by: Felt ball, Tender, and Vibe-ing.
  3. Combined – Thermocraft exemplified by: CHACUN(E), YBML, and Butterfly Lace.

Through expert interviews, Kristi discovers craft and sustainability qualities in smart textiles and suggests ways of implementing those in designing sustainable smart textile services.

Academic publications related to the PhD dissertation:

Journal articles

  • Kuusk, K., Wensveen, S., & Tomico, O. (accepted). Craft Qualities evolving from traditional crafts to smart textile services. Studies in Material Thinking, 16.
  • van der Velden, N. M., Kuusk, K., & Köhler, A. R. (2015). Life cycle assessment and eco-design of smart textiles: The importance of material selection demonstrated through e-textile product redesign. Materials & Design, 84(C), 313–324.
  • Kuusk, K., Tomico, O., Langereis, G., & Wensveen, S. (2012). Crafting Smart Textiles – a meaningful way towards societal sustainability in the fashion field? The Nordic Textile Journal, 1(6-15), 6–15.

Book chapter

  • Kuusk, K. (2013). Crafting Meaningful Smart-Textiles. In Social Fabric (pp. 27–31). Eindhoven: SOCIAL FABRIC.

Proceedings & Conference Contributions

  • Kuusk, K., Kooroshnia, M., & Mikkonen, J. (2015). Crafting Butterfly Lace – Conductive Multi-Color Sensor-Actuator Structure. Presented at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers, Osaka.
  • Kuusk, K., Wensveen, S., & Tomico, O. (2014). Crafting Qualities in Designing QR-coded Embroidery and Bedtime Stories (pp. 1–12). Presented at the Art of Research V, Helsinki.
  • Kuusk, K., Niinimäki, K., Wensveen, S., & Tomico, O. (2014). Smart textile products and services in sustainability context (pp. 1–8). Presented at the Ambience 14&10i3m, Tampere.

Butterfly Lace

Butterfly Lace by Kristi Kuusk (Eindhven University of Technology), Marjan Kooroshnia (The Swedish School of Textiles) & Jussi Mikkonen (Aalto ARTS)  is a Conductive Multi-Color Sensor-Actuator Structure that lies in the intersection of traditional craft and smart materials.

The lace senses how it has been touched, and outputs a programmed behaviour. The conductive yarn in the lace structure acts as a sensor and an actuator at once. After detecting the touch, it warms up to a certain degree and causes the thermo sensitive pigment to change the colour accordingly. The colour mix is optimised to show violet-blue at ambient temperature, orange at 27°C, yellow at 37°C and grey at 47°C.

The development of Butterfly Lace started and carried on as an extension of ArcinTex network workshop (Arcintex, 2014). Multi disciplinary team of researchers collaborated while situated in three countries, to realize conductive multi-color sensor-actuator structure. Over several prototyping sessions, Skype conversations and e-mail exchange, the lace is made in a traditional lace factory in Eindhoven, dyed in Boras and electronic component circle designed as well as assembled during a Berlin residency.

The work was presented at ISWC design exhibition, Osaka, Japan in Sept. 7-11 2015

The work describes background and methods involved in the development of Butterfly Lace.

Some visual insights from the long-distance collaboration:

Testing conductive yarn with themochromic pigment
Testing conductive yarn with themochromic pigment
conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern. Grey part of the symbol is heated up by current, and dark part has already cooled down.
conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern. Grey part of the symbol is heated up by current, and dark part has already cooled down.
Conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern.
Conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern.
Testing conductive thread  with thermochromic pigment in crafted structure
Testing conductive thread with thermochromic pigment in crafted structure
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Choosing lace colours
Choosing lace colours
Making sample laces
Making sample laces
Choosing suitable patterns
Choosing suitable patterns
Finding out machine limits
Finding out machine limits
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Trying out "appearing" and "disappearing" threads in a lace structure
Trying out “appearing” and “disappearing” threads in a lace structure
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

IMG_0777

Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

 

Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

 

Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

Textales Sunny Sunday edition

IMG_6901
Textales Sunny Sunday edition. Photography: Gordon Jack 2014; Model: Carolina

Project realised by: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker Textielfabriek, Gordon & Ioana Jack

With the Sunny Sunday edition, Textales explores the Do-It-Yourself aspects of digital storytelling on textiles. The canvas represents some important locations for a group of friends of a certain time, and the characterised 3D figures play their role in the group story. They can be viewed by freely downloadable augmented reality viewing software Junaio and edited, added any time by anyone.

The textile canvas (designed by Ioana Iliescu-Jack) demonstrates references to the balcony of one of the characters, the beach nearby, a volleyball court, the local restaurant, an airplane and other frequently visited places with personal or group memories. Through a tablet or a smartphone the 3D interpretations (designed by Gordon Jack) of the friends themselves appear. For example: a dog is taking a walk in a secret garden, a girl is playing volleyball in the court, central character is happy on his balcony, skydiver is  flying through the clouds and the snowmen are discovering the beach.

Junaio application is used to detect images on the woven picnic cloth and project 3D character in the augmented reality layer on top of the textile. There is a QR-code that needs to be scanned with the application before a certain figure can be found on the surface. When detected, the character can be moved and resized on the screen. 

Textales Sunny Sunday edition. Photography: Junaio screenshots during Dutch Design Week 2015; Models: Karina, Mymza, Gordon, Ioana, Purec

Textales is a project in the intersection of textile tradition and technological innovation. With Textales the storytelling through traditional textile and augmented reality fairy tale application is explored. Digital properties extend the textile capabilities and allow the long-lasting textile to change in time to follow the pace of life of the users. The developed stories demonstrate the possibilities for such storytelling.

Textales project is rooted in Kristi’s research about craft values and sustainability. The aim for connecting digital dynamic properties with high quality textile is to extend the longevity of textile products through changing the idea of what textiles can do.

Some 3D characters, that can currently be found on the picnic cloth:

Guille test 6
Guille by Gordon Jack
GORDONS PENGUINS 3
Penguins by Gordon Jack

Snowman by Gordon Jack

Collaborators: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker TextielfabriekGordon & Ioana Jack

Textales Dream Bear edition

Textales DreamBear edition
Textales Dream Bear edition. Photography: Katrina Tang Photography 2015; Models: Linda Nete, Airon, Taavi

Project realised by: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker Textielfabriek, Unit040, Kerstin Zabransky

In Textales Dream Bear edition, that is told and illustrated by Kerstin Zabransky the sleepy bear goes wandering around the forrest. Kids can follow the story narrated by their parents and find out how the Dream Bear encounters among other adventures a star, fish, rabbits and an owl. The woven textile design is refined to each story element. The tablet or smartphone application, accompanying the duvet cover and the pillow case, adds an extra layer to the tale by revealing magic characters. The owl, star and other 3D characters appear in augmented reality application with sound effects on the cloth after the textile has been scanned with the smart device.

Textales Dream Bear edition allows the parents to share stories with their kids. The shared tales can be personal experiences subtly woven into the bear narrative, the original Dream Bear adventures or creative imaginations based on the randomly appearing characters of the story. To achieve each of the experience, Textales application has a separate setting for the storyline behaviour: “Narrative On”, “Narrative Off” and “Narrative Random”.

Textales is a project in the intersection of textile tradition and technological innovation. With Textales the storytelling through traditional textile and augmented reality fairy tale application is explored. Digital properties extend the textile capabilities and allow the long-lasting textile to change in time to follow the pace of life of the users. The developed stories demonstrate the possibilities for such storytelling.

Textales project is rooted in Kristi’s research about craft values and sustainability. The aim for connecting digital dynamic properties with high quality textile is to extend the longevity of textile products through changing the idea of what textiles can do.    

Textales Dream Bear edition. Photography: Katrina Tang Photography 2015; Models: Linda Nete, Airon, Taavi

Collaborators: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker Textielfabriek, Unit040, Kerstin Zabransky