From Projects

Vertigo

MAGIC LINING
The project focuses on the possibilities for altering people’s self-perception through the garment’s inside. Fashion is famous for its ability to alter people’s self perception through the looks: supportive garments adjusting the body physically (corset, tights, heels), form elements creating illusions (shoulderpads, 18th century costumes), uniforms or sub-culture looks creating the sense of belonging or exclusion. The current project looks into possible ways of altering self-perception from inside of the garment. Is there a way to change one’s self-perception without relying on the feedback and the need for approval from other people?
Magic Lining builds on the insights from MAGICSHOES project and proposes a garment that allows the wearer’s the feel as if their body would be made of a different material. What happens in the transition moment, when the wearer shifts from his/her own body to the marble on, or the other way around? In the intersection of neuroscience research on mental body-representation (MBR), human-computer interaction (HCI) and real-life smart textile applications, the project ask questions about the meaning of clothing.

Residency localizations:
Main localization: Universidad Loyola Andalucia, Calle Energía Solar, 1, 41014 Sevilla, Spain
DEI Interactive Systems Group, Departamento de Informática, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
HCI group, School of Digital Technologies, Tallinn University

Spellbound

Spellbound

Spellbound is an Estonian-based brand for conscious magic-lovers. The products are designed to shape the future fashion consumption towards sustainability. The items are developed and produced in Estonia. Spellbound explores new sustainable directions in textile and garment design. Simple textile items get interesting twists by the implementation of technology and innovative concepts. Spellbound stands for global knowledge and ideas while using high-quality locally sourced left-over materials and ethical principals for production.

We support sustainability in garment design by using left-over natural materials as the starting point for our product design. We introduce and promote the made-to-order business model in garment design to minimize the over-production and pre-consumer waste. Spellbound’s items are produced (from fabric to finalized garment) locally in Estonia (Europe) following ethics and high-quality standards. We value these sustainability grounds above seasonal fashion colors and fast-changing styles.

We love hidden stories and magic about and in the Spellbound garments. We communicate the textile story from the fabric to the final piece to raise the public awareness. We create surprising dynamic stories on the garments through color-changing materials. The owls start to fly in the night, the animals’ eyes shine in the night forest etc.

Spellbound stretches the borders of what garments can do to give them back their traditionally higher value. Join us to support sustainability, ethical production, magic and innovative routes in garments life cycle.

In Spellbound’s first series of products for Autumn/Winter, Glow-in-the-dark stories come to life on sustainable garments made from left-over fabrics from Estonian companies. The items are produced in Estonia and illustrated by artists based in Estonia and the Netherlands.

We hope you enjoy the journey towards a more sustainable garment design with us!

www.spellbound.ee

Textales Little Red Riding Hood

Textales Little Red Riding Hood edition is developed in collaboration with Unit040, Welspun and Kerstin Zabransky. Welspun India Ltd. is a fully integrated home textile manufacturer. It is one of the largest global home textile producers, with world class manufacturing facilities in India.

With Textales Little Red Riding Hood edition, we take the project another step closer to commercialisation. The version is developed for showcasing the possibilities of Augmented Reality storytelling on textiles to potential clients. In The Little Red Riding Hood edition of Textales, parents and children share the experience of the fairy tale of Little Red Riding Hood through Augmented Reality. The Textales application running on a smartphone or a tablet device detects the patterns on the duvet, pillow and carpet and shows digital fairytale characters. Digital dynamics are combined with textile sustainability. The project team intends to improve the details of the duvet cover as well as the digital application. The images are printed to a softer textile in this iteration, and allow therefore more colours and smaller details to be designed.

The Little Red Riding Hood story can be played with or without the subtitles suggesting theplot, as in the previous version. If the parent chooses to see the subtitles, a whole fairy tale is written throughout different scenes of the story. If the parent chooses not to see the subtitles, he can imagine his adventures for the Little Red Riding Hood and the wolf. The application has a constant forest sound in the background with occasional overriding scene-specific sound effects, such as water dropping when Little Red Riding Hood is feeding the swans, or the wolf roaring when it finds the empty house of the grandmother. The fine and detailed graphics and animations add an extra magic layer to the textile.

In the very colourful story canvas, Little Red Riding Hood goes wandering into the forests on the digitally printed duvet cover, pillow and a rug (Figure 22). The wolf has his parallel adventures. The story reveals an alternative plot and ending to the traditional fairy tale. Through that, contemporary values and ways of communicating are put into a classic fairy tale.

Textales DreamBear edition

Crafting sustainable smart textile services

Kristi Kuusk’s PhD thesis titled “Crafting sustainable smart textile services”
Crafting sustainable smart textile services
Crafting sustainable smart textile services, Kristi Kuusk. Cover: Kerstin Zabransky

The world is looking for solutions to major sustainability challenges that developed with the consumer culture. Among other fields and aspects, the way people design, produce, wear and dispose clothes in the traditional cradle-to-grave model has gained interest. The garment life cycle is continuously innovated from different angles. Examples of sustainable materials, business models and ways of thinking about clothing appear in research and practice both. Independently, the fashion scene gets more and more curious about the possibilities of using electronics and digital properties in clothing, also known as fashion technology, wearable technology and smart textiles. The marriage of the two worlds, that closely influences many people, carries potential concerns and opportunities. Textile manufacturing was one of the drivers of the development of technology from pre-industrial craftsmanship to today’s industrialized consumer culture. In this work, crafts and craftsmanship are taken as an example of sustainable living. The traditional crafts and sustainability are discussed in the context of the developing field of smart textile services. This doctoral dissertation examines the following central research question: what are craft and sustainability qualities and how are they implicitly used in the design of smart textile services?

 

The public PhD defence ceremony took place on 18. Feb 2016:
Chairman: prof.dr.ir. A.C. Brombacher
1st promotor: prof.dr. R. Wakkary
copromotor(s): dr.ir. S.A.G. Wensveen, dr. O. Tomico Plasencia
Comittee: prof.dr. L.-L. Chen, prof.dr. N. Nimkulrat (Estonian Academy of Arts), ir. K. van Os (Philips Research), dr. K. Niinimäki (Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture)

 

The dissertation brings together the smart textile examples with three different levels of integration of textiles and technology:

  1. Separated – Digital Stories on Textile exemplified by: QR coded Embroidery, Bedtime Stories, Textales Dream Bear, and Textales Sunny Sunday editions.
  2. Integrated – Body Sensing and Actuating Networks exemplified by: Felt ball, Tender, and Vibe-ing.
  3. Combined – Thermocraft exemplified by: CHACUN(E), YBML, and Butterfly Lace.

Through expert interviews, Kristi discovers craft and sustainability qualities in smart textiles and suggests ways of implementing those in designing sustainable smart textile services.

Academic publications related to the PhD dissertation:

Journal articles

  • Kuusk, K., Wensveen, S., & Tomico, O. (accepted). Craft Qualities evolving from traditional crafts to smart textile services. Studies in Material Thinking, 16.
  • van der Velden, N. M., Kuusk, K., & Köhler, A. R. (2015). Life cycle assessment and eco-design of smart textiles: The importance of material selection demonstrated through e-textile product redesign. Materials & Design, 84(C), 313–324.
  • Kuusk, K., Tomico, O., Langereis, G., & Wensveen, S. (2012). Crafting Smart Textiles – a meaningful way towards societal sustainability in the fashion field? The Nordic Textile Journal, 1(6-15), 6–15.

Book chapter

  • Kuusk, K. (2013). Crafting Meaningful Smart-Textiles. In Social Fabric (pp. 27–31). Eindhoven: SOCIAL FABRIC.

Proceedings & Conference Contributions

  • Kuusk, K., Kooroshnia, M., & Mikkonen, J. (2015). Crafting Butterfly Lace – Conductive Multi-Color Sensor-Actuator Structure. Presented at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers, Osaka.
  • Kuusk, K., Wensveen, S., & Tomico, O. (2014). Crafting Qualities in Designing QR-coded Embroidery and Bedtime Stories (pp. 1–12). Presented at the Art of Research V, Helsinki.
  • Kuusk, K., Niinimäki, K., Wensveen, S., & Tomico, O. (2014). Smart textile products and services in sustainability context (pp. 1–8). Presented at the Ambience 14&10i3m, Tampere.

Butterfly Lace

Butterfly Lace by Kristi Kuusk (Eindhven University of Technology), Marjan Kooroshnia (The Swedish School of Textiles) & Jussi Mikkonen (Aalto ARTS)  is a Conductive Multi-Color Sensor-Actuator Structure that lies in the intersection of traditional craft and smart materials.

The lace senses how it has been touched, and outputs a programmed behaviour. The conductive yarn in the lace structure acts as a sensor and an actuator at once. After detecting the touch, it warms up to a certain degree and causes the thermo sensitive pigment to change the colour accordingly. The colour mix is optimised to show violet-blue at ambient temperature, orange at 27°C, yellow at 37°C and grey at 47°C.

The development of Butterfly Lace started and carried on as an extension of ArcinTex network workshop (Arcintex, 2014). Multi disciplinary team of researchers collaborated while situated in three countries, to realize conductive multi-color sensor-actuator structure. Over several prototyping sessions, Skype conversations and e-mail exchange, the lace is made in a traditional lace factory in Eindhoven, dyed in Boras and electronic component circle designed as well as assembled during a Berlin residency.

The work was presented at ISWC design exhibition, Osaka, Japan in Sept. 7-11 2015

The work describes background and methods involved in the development of Butterfly Lace.

Some visual insights from the long-distance collaboration:

Testing conductive yarn with themochromic pigment
Testing conductive yarn with themochromic pigment
conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern. Grey part of the symbol is heated up by current, and dark part has already cooled down.
conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern. Grey part of the symbol is heated up by current, and dark part has already cooled down.
Conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern.
Conductive yarn tests with simple crochet pattern.
Testing conductive thread  with thermochromic pigment in crafted structure
Testing conductive thread with thermochromic pigment in crafted structure
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Testing touch sensitive properties of the crafted conductive thread
Choosing lace colours
Choosing lace colours
Making sample laces
Making sample laces
Choosing suitable patterns
Choosing suitable patterns
Finding out machine limits
Finding out machine limits
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Choosing suitable patterns for lace
Trying out "appearing" and "disappearing" threads in a lace structure
Trying out “appearing” and “disappearing” threads in a lace structure
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

IMG_0777

Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

 

Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

 

Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace
Developing Butterfly Lace

Textales Sunny Sunday edition

IMG_6901
Textales Sunny Sunday edition. Photography: Gordon Jack 2014; Model: Carolina

Project realised by: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker Textielfabriek, Gordon & Ioana Jack

With the Sunny Sunday edition, Textales explores the Do-It-Yourself aspects of digital storytelling on textiles. The canvas represents some important locations for a group of friends of a certain time, and the characterised 3D figures play their role in the group story. They can be viewed by freely downloadable augmented reality viewing software Junaio and edited, added any time by anyone.

The textile canvas (designed by Ioana Iliescu-Jack) demonstrates references to the balcony of one of the characters, the beach nearby, a volleyball court, the local restaurant, an airplane and other frequently visited places with personal or group memories. Through a tablet or a smartphone the 3D interpretations (designed by Gordon Jack) of the friends themselves appear. For example: a dog is taking a walk in a secret garden, a girl is playing volleyball in the court, central character is happy on his balcony, skydiver is  flying through the clouds and the snowmen are discovering the beach.

Junaio application is used to detect images on the woven picnic cloth and project 3D character in the augmented reality layer on top of the textile. There is a QR-code that needs to be scanned with the application before a certain figure can be found on the surface. When detected, the character can be moved and resized on the screen. 

Textales Sunny Sunday edition. Photography: Junaio screenshots during Dutch Design Week 2015; Models: Karina, Mymza, Gordon, Ioana, Purec

Textales is a project in the intersection of textile tradition and technological innovation. With Textales the storytelling through traditional textile and augmented reality fairy tale application is explored. Digital properties extend the textile capabilities and allow the long-lasting textile to change in time to follow the pace of life of the users. The developed stories demonstrate the possibilities for such storytelling.

Textales project is rooted in Kristi’s research about craft values and sustainability. The aim for connecting digital dynamic properties with high quality textile is to extend the longevity of textile products through changing the idea of what textiles can do.

Some 3D characters, that can currently be found on the picnic cloth:

Guille test 6
Guille by Gordon Jack
GORDONS PENGUINS 3
Penguins by Gordon Jack

Snowman by Gordon Jack

Collaborators: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker TextielfabriekGordon & Ioana Jack

Textales Dream Bear edition

Textales DreamBear edition
Textales Dream Bear edition. Photography: Katrina Tang Photography 2015; Models: Linda Nete, Airon, Taavi

Project realised by: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker Textielfabriek, Unit040, Kerstin Zabransky

In Textales Dream Bear edition, that is told and illustrated by Kerstin Zabransky the sleepy bear goes wandering around the forrest. Kids can follow the story narrated by their parents and find out how the Dream Bear encounters among other adventures a star, fish, rabbits and an owl. The woven textile design is refined to each story element. The tablet or smartphone application, accompanying the duvet cover and the pillow case, adds an extra layer to the tale by revealing magic characters. The owl, star and other 3D characters appear in augmented reality application with sound effects on the cloth after the textile has been scanned with the smart device.

Textales Dream Bear edition allows the parents to share stories with their kids. The shared tales can be personal experiences subtly woven into the bear narrative, the original Dream Bear adventures or creative imaginations based on the randomly appearing characters of the story. To achieve each of the experience, Textales application has a separate setting for the storyline behaviour: “Narrative On”, “Narrative Off” and “Narrative Random”.

Textales is a project in the intersection of textile tradition and technological innovation. With Textales the storytelling through traditional textile and augmented reality fairy tale application is explored. Digital properties extend the textile capabilities and allow the long-lasting textile to change in time to follow the pace of life of the users. The developed stories demonstrate the possibilities for such storytelling.

Textales project is rooted in Kristi’s research about craft values and sustainability. The aim for connecting digital dynamic properties with high quality textile is to extend the longevity of textile products through changing the idea of what textiles can do.    

Textales Dream Bear edition. Photography: Katrina Tang Photography 2015; Models: Linda Nete, Airon, Taavi

Collaborators: Kristi Kuusk, TU/e, Johan van den Acker Textielfabriek, Unit040, Kerstin Zabransky

Your body – My landscape

Your body – My landscape is a collaboration choreographic performance between Gyula Berger who is an internationally renowned choreographer and has been making work in Hungary for the past 25 years and Roos van Berkel who teaches, performs and creates her own work in Holland since 2008.

Together with their scenography team, a costume with conductive thermo sensitive crochet was created. The costume was used by the dancers to build up parts of the scenography, while reflecting how the use of such material formed their choreographic practice, and the other way around.

The costume has crocheted conductive thermo sensitive lines on top, which can be heated up by the dancers through the needles they are holding in their hands. The needles are connected to a power supply that send 6 Volts of current through the thread. The thread cones its colour from black to grey by the heat created by the current.
Project info: http://ybml.wordpress.com/

Vibe-ing

Vibe-ing is a self-care tool in the form of a garment, which invites the body to feel, move, and heal through vibration therapy. The merino wool garment contains knitted pockets, embedded with electronic circuit boards that enable the garment to sense touch and vibrate specific pressure points on the body. By integrating vibration actuators in textile pockets the design enabled programming the exact areas and the way of stimulation on the body depending on the specific person’s need for rehabilitation and healing. Using fully-fashioned manufacturing technique becomes possible to customise the garment to the preferences of an individual body. The aim of this design was to inform a multi-disciplinary audience about the opportunities of integrating textile and vibration for self-healthcare services at home and in everyday activities.

Photo credits
Photography: Hanneke Wetzer & Bas Berends (Studio HUID & HAAR); Hair & Make-up: Jaimy Bontenbal; Model: Jos van der Weele

Project realised by: Eunjeong Jeon, Kristi Kuusk, Martijn ten Bhömer (TU/e), Jesse Asjes (TextielMuseum TextielLab Tilburg) and Metatronics.

Making of Vibe-ing